5 Things to Know About the MCLE Rule

  1. You Must Earn 12 Credits
    • All attorneys must complete 12 hours of continuing legal education (CLE).
    • Of those 12 credits, two must be ethics.
    • If you earn more than the required 12, you may carry over two credits into the following year.
  2. How to Earn Credits
    • In-person CLE programs: The most common way of earning credits. View the CBA Education calendar for a full list of seminars.
    • On-demand: Access a wide variety of video and audio CLE products through our Education Portal from the comfort of your home or office.
    • Alternative ways to earn: Teaching a CLE program, writing and publishing articles in publications like the Connecticut Lawyer, or by teaching courses by an ABA accredited law school.
  1. Tracking Your Credits
  2. How to Report your MCLE Credits
    • There is no requirement to send in written proof of your MCLE compliance – the program is a self-reporting system. For the full MCLE rule, visit the Connecticut Judicial Branch website.
    • The CBA does not report any credits to the judicial branch and is not affiliated with Connecticut Judicial Branch in any way.
    • Each attorney must keep track of the courses and hours accumulated, and must maintain these records for seven years. Check your CLE Credit Tracker to view the courses you have taken!
  3. MCLE is Easy with the CBA!
    • After earning your 12 credits, all you need to do is indicate that you have complied with the rule on your annual attorney registration form filed with the judicial branch. MCLE is easy with the CBA!

 

Advertisements

Set Yourself Apart as a Leader in the Law

cropped-ct_lawyer_masthead.jpg
Do you have knowledge on hot topics in your practice area that you would like to share with your colleagues? Is there a specific court case you’ve been wanting to examine? We want to hear from you; write for Connecticut Lawyer!

Connecticut Lawyer magazine is a prime member benefit that contributes to your professional growth; informs readers of important legislative changes, court decisions, and other issues arising in the legal profession; and keeps members abreast of CBA activities.

If you would like to submit an article for consideration, have information for the “CBA News & Events” section, or have any other editorial inquiries, please contact the Associate Editor at lzwiebel@ctbar.org. Please review our editorial guidelines on subject matter, format, and deadlines.

Why You Will Become Obsolete

Building Your Practice
Why You Will Become Obsolete
By Walt Hampton

82003af6-213a-4006-84c3-47df9a42b0f1In this Connecticut Lawyer article, Walt Hampton explains how our addiction to the “undisciplined pursuit of more” caused by constant interruptions of checking and re-checking e-mails, smartphones, tablets, etc., disallows us to complete deep work, deeming us replaceable.

Read Walt’s tips on how to stay focused and not become obsolete.

Get more keys to success from Walt Hampton at the CLC:f20eddcb-0a8e-41c4-a703-544d8cc28bfc
Pre-conference Mindfulness Speaker
Legal Tech/Law Firm Practice Management Track Speaker

Be a Part of Our Tradition

Douglas S. Brown

“I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.” – Maya Angelou

CBA Executive Director Douglas S. Brown reflects on the CBA’s signature eventsCelebrate with the Stars and the Connecticut Legal Conference – and their importance t to our state, our association, and our members.

Learn more about the CBA’s signature events in the Weekly Docket.