5 Things to Know About the MCLE Rule

  1. You Must Earn 12 Credits
    • All attorneys must complete 12 hours of continuing legal education (CLE).
    • Of those 12 credits, two must be ethics.
    • If you earn more than the required 12, you may carry over two credits into the following year.
  2. How to Earn Credits
    • In-person CLE programs: The most common way of earning credits. View the CBA Education calendar for a full list of seminars.
    • On-demand: Access a wide variety of video and audio CLE products through our Education Portal from the comfort of your home or office.
    • Alternative ways to earn: Teaching a CLE program, writing and publishing articles in publications like the Connecticut Lawyer, or by teaching courses by an ABA accredited law school.
  1. Tracking Your Credits
  2. How to Report your MCLE Credits
    • There is no requirement to send in written proof of your MCLE compliance – the program is a self-reporting system. For the full MCLE rule, visit the Connecticut Judicial Branch website.
    • The CBA does not report any credits to the judicial branch and is not affiliated with Connecticut Judicial Branch in any way.
    • Each attorney must keep track of the courses and hours accumulated, and must maintain these records for seven years. Check your CLE Credit Tracker to view the courses you have taken!
  3. MCLE is Easy with the CBA!
    • After earning your 12 credits, all you need to do is indicate that you have complied with the rule on your annual attorney registration form filed with the judicial branch. MCLE is easy with the CBA!

 

Volunteer for the High School Mock Trial Competition

The regional rounds of the 2017-2018 High School Mock Trial Competition will take place in early December. High school students from across the state have been busy preparing to try this year’s case, United States v. Storm, a murder case arising from an alleged drug smuggling operation on the Long Island Sound. At the regional rounds, teams compete to qualify for a playoff tournament, leading to the final round before the Connecticut Supreme Court in the spring of next year.

To help make this year’s competition a success, students will need assistance of the bench and bar in courtrooms across the state. Civics First CT is seeking volunteers for the following regional rounds:

  • Stamford (December 1) (10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.)
  • New Haven (December 4 and 11) (2:00 p.m.)
  • Danbury (December 5) (12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.)
  • Manchester (December 5 and 12) (5:00 p.m.)
  • New Britain (December 6 and 13) (3:00 p.m.)
  • Waterbury (December 7 and 14) (11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.)
  • Middletown (December 8 and 15) (2:00 p.m.)

If you are interested in volunteering, please register online to select your dates and times. Civics First CT will follow up with you to confirm availability and provide you with a link to the case and rules, as well as a bench memo to help you get started. Please contact info@civicsfirstct.org with any questions.

For the full version of this week’s Weekly Docket, click here.

Seventh Annual Federal Tax Institute of New England

On Friday, November 10, over 150 attorneys gathered at Saint Clements Castle in Portland, CT for the 2017 Federal Tax Institute of New England. Founded by Frank S. Berall in 2011 and chaired by tax law veteran Deborah J. Tedford, attendees spent the day receiving a comprehensive education from national speakers presenting on cutting edge tax and estate planning issues that may have occurred within the past year, as well as ideas to improve their practice and service to their clients.

Seminar topics varied from how to achieve tax free compounding, important issues in special needs trusts, ethics in tax practice, and a Washington update of tax changes ten months into the Trump administration.

This year’s CBA faculty speakers included: Commissioner Kevin B. Sullivan, Marcel J. Bernier, K. Bradoc “Brad” Gallant, Rebecca A. Iannantuoni, Daniel G. Johnson, Peter S. Jongbloed, Katherine A. McAllister, Lisa E. Perkins, Daniel M. Smolnik, Michael P. Spiro, and Barbara Taylor.

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For more photos from the event, visit our Facebook album!

To see the full version of this week’s Weekly Docket, click here.

Member Spotlight: John Durham

John Durham Member SpotlightCBA member and career prosecutor John Durham has been nominated to be Connecticut’s next US attorney. Attorney Durham was appointed by US Attorney General Jeff Sessions to replace outgoing US Attorney Deirdre M. Daly.

Attorney Durham has worked in the legal profession for 40 years. In that time frame, he has put away mobsters and supervised successful prosecutions of more than a dozen corrupt Connecticut politicians. In 1982 he joined the US attorney’s office where he has worked as deputy US attorney for most of his career.

Member Spotlight: Matthew Weiner

Matt Weiner

Assistant State’s Attorney and Connecticut Lawyer Supreme Deliberations column co-author Matthew Weiner, gives city teens the opportunity to practice baseball and play six months out of the year by volunteering as pitching coach of Hartford’s American Legion team.

American Legion baseball is a national institution that has taught hundreds of thousands of young Americans the importance of sportsmanship, good heath, and promotes equality by making teammates out of young athletes regardless of their income levels. The Connecticut league finished its 90th season this July.

Attorney Weiner spends his days representing Connecticut in criminal appeals and trying cases in the state’s highest courts. He has juggled his caseload with Hartford Legion baseball stating, “I couldn’t really think of a better way to be able to put the work down, at least for a certain period of time, and do something that’s fulfilling in a much different way.”

 

In Memoriam: William R. Jones, Sr.

RWilliam R. Jones, Sr.etired CBA member, William R. Jones, Sr. passed away on September 13, at the age of 97. After graduating from the University of Connecticut School of Law, he founded the firm, now known as, Jones Damia Kaufman & DePaul LLC in Danbury, where he practiced law for 65 years. During his career, he served as Judge of the State Traffic Court, as a State Trial Referee in the Judicial District of Danbury, and was appointed to the Connecticut State Bar Ethics Committee.

Prior to attending law school, Attorney Jones enlisted in the U.S. Navy after earning his B.S. in Geology from St. Lawrence University,  where he was commissioned a hydrographic survey officer. In two years at sea, he helped to chart island invasions as part of the Pacific campaign.

Pre-order the 2018 Membership Guide and Directory Today!

The 2018 CBA Membership Guide and Directory is now available to pre-order. Whether you’re in the office or on the go, this compact reference puts the largest legal community in the state at your fingertips!

The membership Guide and Directory includes:195e2334-5ab0-4f3b-b30d-a9fbab1b965f

  • The complete MCLE rule, including commentary and FAQs
  • Contact information for thousands of your colleagues
  • Listings of CBA officers, chairs, and staff
  • Ways to save money with member benefits

Save 10% on pre-orders of 10 or more!

To see the full version of this week’s Weekly Docket, click here.

2017-2018 CT Court Visitation Program

The Connecticut Court Visitation Program offers tours of geographical area courts to high school and middle school students throughout the state. Each tour consists of an explanation of court proceedings by a judge or member of the court staff, attendance at an arraignment session and an actual trial (if available), along with a question and answer session.

Attorney volunteers participate with the visiting classes, staff each geographical area court during tours, and may also speak with student groups prior to their visits if requested. The Connecticut Bar Association coordinates the program with its attorney volunteers.

Superior Court Judge Hope Seeley of the Tolland Judicial District and chair of the Court Visitation Program Committee, said, “Since its inception in 1980, the Connecticut Court Visitation Program has become a standard part of the Civics and American Government curriculum in many schools in the state and almost 93,000 students from public and private high schools throughout the state have participated in the program.”

The 2017-2018 program will be offered October 1, 2017 – June 1, 2018. For more information and to volunteer, please contact Bill Chapman at bchapman@ctbar.org.

CT Court Visitation Program

Volunteer for Stand Down 2017

Stand Down for homeless veterans was modeled after the Stand Down concept used during the Vietnam War to provide a safe retreat for units returning from combat operations. At the secure base camp areas, troops were able to take care of personal hygiene, get clean uniforms, enjoy warm meals, receive medical and dental care, mail and receive letters, and enjoy the camaraderie of friends in a safe environment. This afforded battle-weary soldiers the opportunity to renew their spirit, health, and overall sense of well-being.

Volunteers for this program help veterans with their legal needs, and direct them to where they may receive resolution. Since the first Stand Down in San Diego in 1988, the program has become recognized as the most valuable outreach tool to help veterans across the nation today.

This year’s Stand Down will be held on Friday, September 22 from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. at the Veterans Home in Rocky Hill. If you are interested in volunteering, or have any questions, please contact Bill Chapman at (860)707-3309 or bchapman@ctbar.org.

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CBA Volunteer Major Michael E. Criscuolo, a JAG attorney with the US Army, providing legal help to a fellow veteran at the 2016 Stand Down event.